Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Nine Cents Makes The Difference



It's called psychological pricing, and even though people are aware that everything is priced ending with 99¢ we still gravitate towards those slightly-lower prices. But, how long has this been going on?    It must have started sometime with price sticker guns, or maybe with the UPC code?    Nope:  here's an article from 1898 outlining the psychological preference for prices ending in 9.



ODD NUMBERS IN PRICES

Fascination of the Bargain Counters, Nine Cent Goods Sell Better Than Eight. 

In speaking of special sales the other day and of the figures that seem to attract the public the most, as well as the class of customers who frequent these sales, an old and successful merchant said:

 "There is a fascination in odd numbers that always draws purchasers. Now, I will call your attention to some of the marked-down articles that are being sold on our bargain counter. Notice those neckties that are marked at 37½ cents' three for a dollar; it is an actual fact that we sold twice as many of them at 37½ cents as we would sell at 35, and we sell as many again by allowing three for $1. When a man sees them selling at 37½ cents he naturally imagines that they are 50-cent goods, and he reasons that he can get three cheaper than he can one, so he takes three. He really does get a bargain, but he would not take it at a less attractive figure.


"Speaking of odd numbers, it is a curious fact that some are much more attractive than others. Nine cents, for instance, is one of the most attractive figures, and sells more goods than 8 cents would. Thirteen and 17 cents are by no means so good as 19 cents for running off an extra line, while 21 and 23 are comparatively poor sellers. Thirty-seven and a half cents is a great favorite, and better than 39 by far. Forty-nine used to be much better than it is now. I attribute the fact that it is less popular to the number of jokes that have been made upon it.

"When you get above 50 cents people commence to look more at the real value of a thing and less at the price charged. Seventy-nine cents is a great favorite, and 99 is one of the best figures still that we have to sell at, although not so good as it used to be. It will sell, however, 25 per cent. more goods than $1."—Washington Post.


This appeared in the Bismarck (ND) Tribune on 5 September, 1898, but is attributed to the Washington Post; it also appeared in the August 1898 edition of the Practical Druggist and Review of Reviews, and a number of other local newspapers as a wire story.

This was at a time when a penny was the equivalent of a quarter today: the difference between $1.99 and $2.00 had a genuine impact on a shopper's pocketbook, unlike today when it's an accounting fudge that only adds up over a week's worth of transactions.

Note: I did try to figure out what "jokes" the number 49 precipitated at the time, but the only possible connection I could think would be regarding the 1849 gold rush, which seems an odd thing to dissuade shoppers, so the actual jokes may be an 'improper' sort of thing to print in the paper.

But, when it comes down to it, retailers have been using psychological pricing for at least a hundred and twenty years, encouraging people to buy products with nines in the prices.  Like today, your grandmother probably knew about the pricing tricks -- but like today, still bought them anyway!


Sunday, February 7, 2016

Recipes From The Prairie



The Bad Lands Cow Boy (spaces intentional) was one of the earliest newspapers in Dakota Territory -- positioned out in the far west edge of the region, with very little else was in the area.   Those that lived in the badlands were homesteading pioneers, trying to eke out a living with miles upon miles between their home and civilization.

So, you can imagine the newspaper's recipe section is designed to be simple, difficult to mess up, and requiring a minimum of basic ingredients.   Here's a selection from February, 1884:


Recipes for "Home."
  • Cookies.--One cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, well beaten, one teaspoonful soda, and one tablespoonful ginger; flour to make a soft dough; roll thin and bake quickly.
  • Roll Jelly Cake.--Three eggs, well beaten; one cup butter; one cup sugar; one cup flour; one teaspoonful soda, and nutmeg to suit your taste; bake ten minutes in long pan; spread with jelly and roll; wrap in a cloth around it till cool.
  • Lazy Woman's Pie.--Two eggs, two tablespoons sugar, two heaping tablespoons flour, two-thirds of a pint of sweet milk; flavor same as custard pie, and bake without a crust in a buttered pie-tin.
  • Currant Pudding.--Two eggs, one-fourth cup sugar, two tablespoons butter, two-thirds pint sour milk, and one-half teaspoonful soda; flour enough to make a thick batter; then flour one teacupful of English currants, stir them in, and steam one and one-half hours; to be eaten with cream and sugar, or pudding sauce.
  • Lemon Jelly.--Juice of one lemon, one cup sugar, one egg, one tablespoonful butter; boil till thick.


If you're unfamiliar with your nineteenth-century cooking terminology, here's some help:

You'll note that all these ingredients are the kind of pantry materials that don't require special storage or (like milk and eggs) can be gotten directly from the source on short notice.  The exact sort of things you'd have bought in bulk in town, a couple month's-worth at a time, because you might be stuck on your claim for a while before you can get back into town again.  

Monday, February 1, 2016

The February (And Final) Monthly Vintage Macaroon Cookie Recipe

This February brings us to the completion of the monthly macaroon recipes... *sigh* At least it is a clever Lollipop idea for Valentine's Day! (Remember, you start with this basic recipe!)


Friday, January 1, 2016

January's Vintage Macaroon Of The Month Recipe

Because we did not begin posting in January, it may seem that I forgot the recipe -- but it is the basic Lever House Macaroon Recipe.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

What To Get Him For Christmas?

From the Bismarck (ND) Tribune, 12/18/1913, a helpful article anticipating just how hard it is to find presents for guys.  I love how, a hundred years ago, they, too, lamented the fact that everyone gives a tie -- no matter how unbecoming or absurd -- as the generic go-to gift for men!


WHAT TO GIVE HIM FOR A CHRISTMAS GIFT

Useful Offerings That Every Man Is Sure to Appreciate

A man is only a man after all, and he likes useful gifts, no matter who he may be.  If you are wealthy or if your income is quite moderate the following gift suggestions may be adopted, as they are things that may cost only a little or may be quite expensive:


It is rather curious that women's one idea of a gift to a man is a cravat, for it is the one thing that a man detests having selected for him.  But a man can nearly always wager that a woman will get him a cravat of a color that is not becoming to him or one that is too absurd to wear.  And yet hundreds of thousands of women insist upon giving cravats for Yuletide gifts!



If you are overpowered by this idea please have a little mercy on mankind and select black and white cravats, for they are smart and becoming to every man.  Silk knitted ties are again in vogue, especially those that are three to four inches wide.  Ties of heavy faconne silks are also indorsed by London.



Something Unique in Handkerchiefs.



 Handkerchiefs are always welcomed by a man if you give him plain white and do not attempt to choose colors for him unless you are his wife and know absolutely whether he prefers blue, lavender, green, gray, or another color.  To make the handkerchiefs more gifty have his initials embroidered in a unique design.
 The handkerchiefs in the {picture} are exceedingly new and attractive.  The initial is worked on a square of lace in fillet design.  If one is not expeditious with the needle the all over fillet net in the mesh could be purchased and cut up into the required size for the squares.


Leather Gifts.

 It is nearly always a man's fate to receive an abundance of unnecessary leather articles at Yuletide.  There are men who never fail to get at least six leather mounted desk calendars and as many stamps and elastic bandboxes.  Of course these are needfuls, but the man who possesses a desk generally has all such articles.

Wallets and cardcases are always usable, and a man is pleased if he gets them in the latest styles every Christmas.

A leather traveling case makes a delightful gift if it is of the best quality--not all the investment in the case, but in the fittings too.  It reflects better taste if you give a small and beautifully fitted case rather than one filled with a shoddy toilet collection and a cleaning apparatus.

 A fitted travelling bag makes a superior gift if you wish to expend that much money--$25 or more.  If so, it is advisable to get ivory, imitation ivory, or ebony fittings, as they are not quite so heavy as those of silver.  The man who travels will be pleased to death with the nearly put up leather case seen in the illustration that is filled with scissors of different sizes and a penknife.  And for the man who rides horseback what more appropriate than the whisk broom holder mounted in a stirrup setting?

I can almost guarantee that the "guy gifts" section at Kohl's -- the refuge of every person with a hard-to-buy-for-dude in their life -- is full of pretty much the same things: toiletry kits, things to clean up with, handkerchiefs.  Dads and other guys have been opening the same presents, every Christmas, for a hundred years!

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Holiday Delights: The "Macaroon Of The Month" Recipe For December

As always, we begin each Macaroon Of The Month recipe with the basic recipe for Lever House Macaroons from Aunt Jenny's Old-Fashioned Christmas Cookies & Other All-Time Favorites. Bonus: It includes a gift idea!

Sunday, November 1, 2015

Cinnamon Sugar Plums: The "Macaroon Of The Month" Recipe

November's Macaroon Of The Month begins with this vintage recipe.


Thursday, October 1, 2015

The Vintage Macaroon Of The Month Recipe For October (& Halloween!)

Orange 'N' Date Macaroons are the Macaroon Of The Month. (Remember, the basic recipe is here!)


Tuesday, September 1, 2015

The Vintage Macaroon Of The Month Recipe For September

Spicy Apple "Macs" for school lunches!  The basic recipe begins here, with the Lever House Macaroons recipe from 1952's Aunt Jenny's Old-Fashioned Christmas Cookies & Other All-Time Favorites.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Vintage "Macroon Of The Month" Recipe For August

Peanut Macaroons are suggested to be served with minted fruit juices. ...I'm not sure I'm down with trying that. Again, the basic recipe you begin with is here.


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Vintage Praline Macaroon Recipe

The Macaroon Of The Month recipe for July is Praline Macaroons. In keeping with the Mid-Century Modern lifestyle, these cookies are said to be perfect for picnics -- and, served with sugared berries or chilled melon balls, a hit at garden suppers.




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